Idaho Population Growth Strongest Since 2008

Jan 10th, 2017 | By | Category: Economic Indexes

Press Release

People in a group populationIdaho’s population grew by 1.8 percent between mid-2015 and mid-2016, the third strongest increase of all states and 1.1 percentage point ahead of the national growth rate.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the state’s population was 1,683,140 as of July 1, 2016, an estimated increase of more than 30,300. This was the strongest increase since 2008 when the population grew 1.9 percent with an increase of 29,200.

Idaho’s population growth can be attributed to a high birth rate and domestic migration, which accounted for 90 percent of the state’s population growth. Idaho ranked fifth in the country for in-migration as nearly 19,000 people moved from other states and countries between mid-2015 and mid-2016. The state’s birth rate was 13.7 births per thousand women, the seventh highest in the country.

Utah’s population exceeded 3 million as it became the nation’s fastest growing state with a 2 percent increase in population, followed by Nevada, Idaho, Florida, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, Arizona, District of Columbia and Texas. Eight states – Mississippi, Wyoming, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, West Virginia and Illinois – lost population.

From 1990 through 2010 Idaho posted annual population growth rates of more than 1 percent, exceeding 2 percent a year during the mid-2000s expansion and 3 percent in 1993 and 1994. In 2012 growth slid to just 0.7 percent, matching the national rate. In 2013 Idaho’s rate rose to 1 percent while the national rate remained at 0.7 percent. Idaho continued to be above the national rate at 1.8 percent compared with 0.7 percent nationally.

However, Utah is now the nation’s fastest growing state.

Utah’s population crossed the 3.0 million mark as it became the nation’s fastest-growing state over the last year. Its population increased 2.0 percent to 3.1 million from July 1, 2015, to July 1, 2016, according to U.S. Census Bureau national and state population estimates released in December.

“States in the South and West continued to lead in population growth,” said Ben Bolender, Chief of the Population Estimates Branch. “In 2016, 37.9 percent of the nation’s population lived in the South and 23.7 percent lived in the West.”

Following Utah, Nevada (2.0 percent), Idaho (1.8 percent), Florida (1.8 percent) and Washington (1.8 percent) saw the largest percentage increases in population.

North Dakota, which had been the fastest-growing state for the previous four years, mostly from people moving into the state, fell out of the top ten in growth due to a net outflow of migrants to other parts of the country. Its growth slowed from 2.3 percent in the previous year to 0.1 percent.

Nationally, the U.S. population grew by 0.7 percent to 323.1 million. Furthermore, the population of voting-age residents, adults age 18 and over, grew to 249.5 million, making up 77.2 percent of the population in 2016, an increase of 0.9 percent from 2015 (247.3 million).

Eight states lost population between July 1, 2015, and July 1, 2016, including Pennsylvania, New York and Wyoming, all three of which had grown the previous year. Illinois lost more people than any other state (-37,508).

Two states that had been losing population in the previous year, Maine and New Mexico, saw increases in population of 0.15 and 0.03 percent respectively.

In addition to the population data for the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the new estimates show that Puerto Rico had an estimated population of 3.4 million, a decline from 3.5 million in 2015. Estimates of the components of population change (births, deaths, and migration) were also released in December.

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